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    Phenix City, Alabama was Once the Most Dangerous City in America

    Phenix City, Alabama has a population of 36,435 according to the 2019 statistics. But there was a time that it was even less populated and yet very dangerous. It may be hard to believe, but this little spot in the road on the Alabama side of the Chattahoochee River was controlled by organized crime, whorehouses and gambling; just to name a few issues plaguing the area. According to the Encyclopedia of Alabama: A 1954 report by the US Army’s Criminal Investigation Division stated that the small town had more per capita incidences of venereal disease and violence than any other city in America! Indeed. It was so out of control that…

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    No Rest Until There’s Justice in the “Moore’s Ford lynchings of 1946 “

    Justice is a word that’s thrown around so much that we sometimes forget what it really means. It’s a cliche’ to some and an unattainable goal to others. July 25, 1946: In the sweltering heat that by some estimates had reached a high of nearly 100 degrees, two black couples between 20 and 30 years of age, were crossing Moore’s Ford Bridge in the country side of Walton County, Georgia. Their names: George and May Murray Dorsey and Roger and Dorothy Dorsey Malcom. Out of nowhere, in broad daylight, approximately 20 (unmasked) white men converged on the car with guns aimed. Dragged out, no doubt in terror, the two couples…

  • Interesting People,  Legendary Crimes in the South

    Lena Baker: The First and Only Woman Killed in Georgia’s Electric Chair

    Lena Baker was the first and only woman to be executed in Georgia’s electric chair. She was executed in 1945, after she was convicted of murdering a man who had imprisoned her. At the time of Baker’s execution, the Georgia prison system was under scrutiny for reform. In August 2005 Baker was pardoned posthumously by the state Board of Pardons and Paroles. The board acknowledged that the 1945 decision to deny Lena Baker clemency was “a grievous error” and that she could have been charged with the lesser crime of voluntary manslaughter, which would have prevented the sentence of capital punishment. What I done, I did in self-defense, or I…